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(i) The British appointed chiefs of different sub-groups of the Maasais, who were made responsible for the affairs of the tribe.

 (ii) They imposed restrictions on raiding and warfare, thereby restricting the authority of elders and warriors.

 (iii) The chiefs, often collected wealth over time. They had a regular income with which they could buy animals, goods and land.

 (iv) They lent money to poor neighbours who needed cash to pay taxes. Many of them began to live in towns as traders.

(v) Their wives and children stayed back in the villages to look after the animals.

 (vi) These chiefs managed to survive the devastations of war and drought. They had now both pastoral and non-pastoral income, and could buy animals when their stock was depleted.

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